Remembering That The Federal Circuit Court Held: The States, as a matter of due process, may not infringe upon the individual rights of citizens (as guaranteed by the Second Amendment) to keep and bear arms.

minute_man_tn2The States, as a matter of due process, may not infringe upon the individual rights of citizens (as guaranteed by the Second Amendment) to keep and bear arms.

Filed April 20, 2009

We therefore conclude that the right to keep and bear arms is “deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition.”

Colonial revolutionaries, the Founders, and a host of commentators and lawmakers living during the first one hundred years of the Republic all insisted on the fundamental nature of the right. It has long been regarded as the “true palladium of liberty.”

Colonists relied on it to assert and to win their independence, and the victorious Union sought to prevent a recalcitrant South from abridging it less than a century later.

The crucial role this deeply rooted right has played in our birth and history compels us to recognize that it is indeed fundamental, that it is necessary to the Anglo-American conception of ordered liberty that we have inherited.

The surprise?  The Circuit Court which handed down this decision is the Ninth Circuit Court in CA.There’s another gem in the footnotes:

But we do not measure the protection the Constitution affords a right by the values of our own times. If contemporary desuetude sufficed to read rights out of the Constitution, then there would be little benefit to a written statement of them. Some may disagree with the decision of the Founders to enshrine a given right in the Constitution. If so, then the people can amend the document. But such amendments are not for the courts to ordain.